Mine Sites

Welcome to the PLWM Mine Sites directory. This is work in progress but our aim is to put on the map (Bing map coming soon) a number of sites in uplands Ceredigion which have a wealth of history and interesting places to visit or read about. Feel free to Join as a member and add your own mine site(s). The only stipulation is that the mines are in the uplands of Ceredigion.

We are happy to link to Coflein the online database of the National Monuments Record of Wales allows people to search for more information on chosen sites and provides text descriptions, photographs and lists any further information in the archive that is accessible to the public.  http://www.coflein.gov.uk/  

Ystrad Einion Mine (Dolgoch Mine)
Ystrad Einion Mine is situated between Aberystwyth and Machynlleth,  just off the Furnace turning to Artists Valley, about 3km up the road.This old mine produced some lead, zinc and copper. It was first worked about 1700, and again in 1745 to...
barrell
Bronfloyd is the nearest mine to Aberystwyth and exists just off a public right of way, so you would need to check with the landowner that you could visit the remains.The remains of Bronfloyd lead mine, including buildings, processing floors...
Pontrhydygroes wheel
Pontrhydygroes grew into an important village when it became the centre of the nineteenth-century Lisburne lead mines. The name means "bridge by the ford of the cross", indicating that the crossing point over the Ystwyth at the bottom of...
The newly restored ventilation chimney at Cwmsymlog
Cwmsymlog is a very ancient mine. It was worked in the mid 18th century and was described by Lewis Morris as ‘the richest in Lead and Silver of any of his Majesty’s Dominions’ (Bick 1988, 19). From the 1620s, under Sir Hugh...
Esgair Hir Mine
Esgair Hir and Esgair Fraith mines were usually worked in conjunction as they where both on the same vein. Esgair Fraith is where most of the copper production came from in the output figures. The first record of activity was in 1691 when it was...
Cwm Rheidol Mine
On the south side of the valley four mines operated up to 1855 when they were consolidated into the Rheidol United Mines (Prichard 1985, 5-7). Ownership changed and new companies were formed, but mining continued throughout the 19th century and into...
Esgair Fraith Mine
Esgair Hir and Esgair Fraith mines were usually worked in conjunction as they where both on the same vein. Esgair Fraith is where most of the copper production came from in the output figures. The first record of activity was in 1691 when it was...
Cwmystwyth Mine
Cwm Ystwyth is considered the most important non-ferrous metal mining site in Wales providing a premier example of mining heritage in Ceredigion. Within the site there is evidence for all phases of mining activity; from the Bronze Age, through the...
Gwaith Goch Mine (Cwm Rheidol)
On the south side of the valley four mines operated up to 1855 when they were consolidated into the Rheidol United Mines (Prichard 1985, 5-7). Ownership changed and new companies were formed, but mining continued throughout the 19th century and into...
Bwlch Glas Mine
Bwlchglas: The Hafan tramway ran along the southern slopes of the valleys and passed between the mine buildings at Bwlchglas on its way to the incline. The mine finally closed in 1923. The remains of the concrete processing plant still remain.
Frongoch
One of the largest mines in North Ceredigion, Frongoch is a fairly famous lead and zinc mine situated near Pontrhydygroes in central Wales. Although mining at Frongoch started in the mid 1700's, largescale mining did not commence until 1834 when it...
Castell Mine, Dyffryn Castell
Castell mine near Ponterwyd was first recorded as being opened by Thomas Bonsall in 1785 for sphalerite. It appears to have been closed by 1803. The vein is a major fault system which has been traced for several kms, and has been exploited by a...
Ystumtuen Mine (Penrhiw Mine)
Penrhiw is one of a group of ancient mines, worked through to the late 19th century, on the high ground north of the Rheidol - see also Bwlchgwyn and Llwynteifi. They were, at times, worked as one concern and the features evident on one sett cannot...
Henfwlch
Henfwlch was mostly worked in conjunction with Hafan mine. Henfwlch possibly started work befor 1750. Recorded development dates from 1850 and was worked on a number of occasions to 1890. Recorded output is 623 tons of lead ore, 25 tons of copper...
Wemyss Mine with the Belgian Mill
Wemyss - which is part of the Frongoch mines has the remains of a Belgian Mill and other features and was the old tramway route from Frongoch.  Situated adjacent to the roadside it is easily viewed by members of the public. It is not far from...
Temple Mine
Temple is a very interesting small mine in a wonderful setting. There are remains of two ore-bins, various retaining walls, a wheelpit and crusher house, with a cleft in the rock above the river marking the site of a second wheelpit, the outline...
Llywernog Mine (and museum)
Known locally as Gwaith Poole. (Poole's Minework), the original discovery of the mineral vein was made around the year 1742, during the reign of George III. The names of the original prospectors are not known but they would have possessed a Mining...
Mwynglawdd Darren Mine
An old mine near to the Bronfloyd mine in Pen-Bont Rhydybeddau Darren is part of the Darren-Cwmsymlog fault/vein system. The mine may be pre-Roman but this is unproven. Old tools were found when the mine was reopened in 1850. These could have been...
Pontceunant Generating Station - part of the Frongoch Mines
As part of the Frongoch Mines, Pontceunant Generating Station was built in 1899 at the cost of £11,400 by the Belgian company "Societe Anonyme Metallurgique" shortly after they took over the Frongoch mine.  They modernised the...
Graig Goch Mine
Graig Goch mine is situated nearby to Frongoch Mines.  Towards the close of the Great War, the Lisburne Development Syndicate commissioned a ropeway from Frongoch to Graig Goch where a new mill was erected to dress dump material.  It...

Safety: Mine sites are very dangerous places and must be treated with respect: -

(i)  For your own safety, there are very deep shafts; never enter any old working at any time.  Keep children under close supervision at all time.

(ii) For the landowner, every mine site is owned by somebody, always attempt to find who owns the land and ask permission, most landowners are keen on their areas of heritage, if you walk to a mine along a public footpath, take care not to stray too far from it.

(iii) For the environment, most mine sites in Ceredigion have lain undisturbed for an excess of one hundred years, in some cases “mother nature” has started to heal the wounds inflicted by years of mining activity, take care not to disturb tips, growing vegetation, walls and building remains, above all please do not use mine sites as rubbish dumps for old cars, “white goods”, building rubble and other refuse, or as playgrounds for Off Roads Vehicles and Motor Cycles

 

By treating these sites with respect, we can all work together to preserve Ceredigion’ wonderful mining heritage